Smith Wesson Model 69 Reviews

Smith Wesson Model 69 Reviews

Smith Wesson Model 69 Review

Smith Wesson Model 69

Smith Wesson Model 69 Review

January 30, 2018 by guncarryreviews.com

As a person with smaller hands/shorter fingers I have always had issues with the monster caliber handguns. While some may have a bit of a stretch for the trigger most of the big caliber revolvers simply look and feel like a flare gun in my hands. This has been an issue for me for the over 20 years I’ve wanted a 44 magnum revolver. In my teen years my father bought me a Marlin lever action 44 rifle for hunting. Ever since, I wanted a revolver tho match the ammo between my rifle and sidearm.

Smith Wesson Model 69 Review

Smith Wesson Model 69

Smith Wesson Model 69 Review

January 30, 2018 by americanrifleman.org

It was Mark Twain who once coined the phrase "... the report of my death was an exaggeration." That pithy observation might also fit the state of affairs with the traditional double-action/single-action revolver from Smith & Wesson-the Hand Ejector series. They have been making them up there in Springfield, Mass., since the 1890s, but their popularity has declined in the wake of the current enthusiasm for black plastic pistols. Through the decades of Hand Ejector production, there have been some great milestones-the Triple Lock of 1907, the service .45s of 1917, the first Magnum in 1935 and many more. Guns like those classics have been the visible manifestations of a sound design, but there are many, many little things improved slowly and almost invisibly. Things such as the hammer block safety of the '20s and the bolt block of the '80s show the maker's willingness to evolve.

Smith Wesson Model 69 Review

Smith Wesson Model 69

Smith Wesson Model 69 Review

January 30, 2018 by americanhunter.org

A handgun does no good on a shelf back in camp. But the trouble is, handguns chambered for cartridges appropriate for wilderness protection and/or big-game hunting tend to be a bit heavy. It’s common enough to head into the hunt with good intentions, but after a few exhausting days when even your shoelaces become too heavy, you often find a reason to leave the handgun behind.